Congratulations to the 2018 - 2019 Inaugural Cohort!

 
 
 
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About the Program

The Climate Leaders Program for Professional Students at Harvard is a new student-led, faculty-advised program for Master's and professional doctorate students across all Harvard graduate schools, developed in partnership with the Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE). 

This program provides students with a hands-on opportunity to engage with others across Harvard who share a professional interest in climate-related work, to mentor one another in their development as practitioners, and to develop professional skills and relationships that support their future careers. 

 

The program – which includes a weekend fall retreat at the Harvard Forest, dinners and workshops with leaders in the field, and a year-end event – will accept up to 40 Master's and professional doctorate students from at least 5 Harvard graduate schools, prioritizing students with a demonstrated interest in climate-related work. 

The program will be led by a team of participating students, with guidance from advising faculty. The content of the workshops, dinners, and other programming will evolve throughout the year and from cohort-to-cohort, based on the shared values, interests, and priorities of the current cohort. Participants and faculty will be actively engaged in the design and execution of the program throughout the year.

The Climate Leaders Program for Professional Students at Harvard is a product of many efforts across campus to secure additional opportunities for cross-Harvard collaboration for students with a professional interest in climate-related work. It is primarily organized and administered in partnership with the Harvard University Center for the Environment, with additional partners across the University.

Program Activities

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Weekend Retreat at the harvard forest

The program kicks off with a weekend intensive retreat with fellow participants in the Harvard Forest, a 3,500 acres facility owned and managed by Harvard in Petersham, Massachusetts. The forest is a site for internationally-significant climate science research. Students will stay overnight in the Forest in on-site facilities. During the weekend, students will get to know peers from across Harvard's graduate schools who share a professional interest in climate-related work, while setting program priorities and establishing a foundation for the inaugural year of the Climate Leaders Program.

 
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dinners with leaders in the field

Over the fall and spring terms, participants will organize at least eight dinners with key leaders and experts in the field, based on the interests of their peers in the program. The climate-related topics covered at these dinners, as well as the overall format of the dinner, are left to the participants to determine together. Program participants will receive support from the Harvard University Center for the Environment and from faculty advisors in securing guests to come speak with students. 

 
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Practitioner workshops

Over the fall and spring terms, participants will organize at least four workshops, focusing on developing critical skills. These workshops will allow participates to dive deep into climate-related topics like designing a low-carbon economy, negotiating across differences, managing effective multidisciplinary teams, or other topics of interest to the cohort as a whole. 

Additional University Partners

 
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Faculty Advisors

 
  Gina McCarthy  is Professor of the Practice of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment. In this capacity, she leads the development of the School’s strategy in climate science, health, and sustainability; strengthens the climate science and health curriculum; and liaises with climate science leaders across the University.  She led EPA initiatives that cut air pollution, protected water resources, reduced greenhouse gases, and strengthened chemical safety to better protect more Americans, especially the most vulnerable, from negative health impacts. McCarthy signed the Clean Power Plan, which set the first-ever national standards for reducing carbon emissions from existing power plants, underscoring the country’s commitment to domestic climate action and spurring international efforts that helped secure the Paris Climate Agreement. McCarthy worked with the United Nations and the World Health Organization on a variety of efforts and represented the U.S. on global initiatives to reduce high-risk sources of pollution.  McCarthy has been a leading advocate for common sense strategies to protect public health and the environment for more than 30 years. She served under President Barack Obama as the 13th Administrator of the EPA from 2013–2017.  A longtime public servant, McCarthy was previously Assistant Administrator for the EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Deputy Secretary of the Massachusetts Office of Commonwealth Development, and Undersecretary of Policy for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. ( Click Here for Full Bio )

Gina McCarthy is Professor of the Practice of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment. In this capacity, she leads the development of the School’s strategy in climate science, health, and sustainability; strengthens the climate science and health curriculum; and liaises with climate science leaders across the University.

She led EPA initiatives that cut air pollution, protected water resources, reduced greenhouse gases, and strengthened chemical safety to better protect more Americans, especially the most vulnerable, from negative health impacts. McCarthy signed the Clean Power Plan, which set the first-ever national standards for reducing carbon emissions from existing power plants, underscoring the country’s commitment to domestic climate action and spurring international efforts that helped secure the Paris Climate Agreement. McCarthy worked with the United Nations and the World Health Organization on a variety of efforts and represented the U.S. on global initiatives to reduce high-risk sources of pollution.

McCarthy has been a leading advocate for common sense strategies to protect public health and the environment for more than 30 years. She served under President Barack Obama as the 13th Administrator of the EPA from 2013–2017.

A longtime public servant, McCarthy was previously Assistant Administrator for the EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, Deputy Secretary of the Massachusetts Office of Commonwealth Development, and Undersecretary of Policy for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. (Click Here for Full Bio)

  Wendy B. Jacobs, Esq.  is the Emmett Clinical Professor of Environmental Law and Director of the Harvard Law School Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic. She serves on the Faculty of the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment and as Special Adviser to the HLS Dean on Learning and Practice. She is a member of the American College of Environmental Lawyers and is the Board Chair of the Clean Air Task Force.  In the Clinic, Ms. Jacobs and her students work on a variety of complex environmental and energy law and policy projects, with a focus on citizen science, climate change mitigation, resiliency and displacement, sustainable aquaculture and agriculture, renewable energy, microgrids and district energy, carbon capture and sequestration, improved oversight and management of offshore drilling, protection of the Arctic, energy justice, and protection of national monuments. In 2017, she launched the Climate Solutions Living Lab course, in which advanced students from multiple disciplines across Harvard University collaborate in designing projects to help universities and other enterprises reduce climate impacts via off-campus actions and investments.  Prior to joining Harvard Law School, Ms. Jacobs practiced environmental and administrative law as a partner in the Boston law firm Foley Hoag LLP for 20 years, and before that as an appellate attorney and special litigator for the U.S. Department of Justice Environment Division in Washington, D.C. Ms. Jacobs received her J.D. with honors in 1981 from Harvard Law School, where she was an editor of the Harvard Law Review.  For information about Ms. Jacobs’ work, please visit the Clinic’s website at  http://environment.law.harvard.edu/emmett-clinic/ .

Wendy B. Jacobs, Esq. is the Emmett Clinical Professor of Environmental Law and Director of the Harvard Law School Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic. She serves on the Faculty of the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment and as Special Adviser to the HLS Dean on Learning and Practice. She is a member of the American College of Environmental Lawyers and is the Board Chair of the Clean Air Task Force.

In the Clinic, Ms. Jacobs and her students work on a variety of complex environmental and energy law and policy projects, with a focus on citizen science, climate change mitigation, resiliency and displacement, sustainable aquaculture and agriculture, renewable energy, microgrids and district energy, carbon capture and sequestration, improved oversight and management of offshore drilling, protection of the Arctic, energy justice, and protection of national monuments. In 2017, she launched the Climate Solutions Living Lab course, in which advanced students from multiple disciplines across Harvard University collaborate in designing projects to help universities and other enterprises reduce climate impacts via off-campus actions and investments.

Prior to joining Harvard Law School, Ms. Jacobs practiced environmental and administrative law as a partner in the Boston law firm Foley Hoag LLP for 20 years, and before that as an appellate attorney and special litigator for the U.S. Department of Justice Environment Division in Washington, D.C. Ms. Jacobs received her J.D. with honors in 1981 from Harvard Law School, where she was an editor of the Harvard Law Review.

For information about Ms. Jacobs’ work, please visit the Clinic’s website at http://environment.law.harvard.edu/emmett-clinic/.

  Jerold S. Kayden  is the Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. His teaching and scholarship address issues of land use and environmental law, public and private real estate development, public space, and urban disasters and climate change. His books include  Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience; Urban Disaster Resilience: New Dimensions from International Practice in the Built Environment; Landmark Justice: The Influence of William J. Brennan on America's Communities ; and  Zoning and the American Dream: Promises Still To Keep .  As urban planner and lawyer, Professor Kayden has advised governments, non-governmental organizations, and real estate developers in the United States and around the world. He has consulted for the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, the United States Agency for International Development, and the United Nations Development Programme, among others, working principally in Armenia, China, Nepal, Russia, and Ukraine. Since 1991, he has served as principal constitutional counsel to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Washington, D.C., and leads  Advocates for Privately Owned Public Space , a non-profit organization based in New York City.  At the Design School, where he served as co-chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, he was recognized schoolwide as “Teacher of the Year.” He earned his undergraduate, law, and city and regional planning degrees from Harvard, and subsequently was law clerk to Judge James L. Oakes of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. of the U.S. Supreme Court. ( Click Here for Full Bio )

Jerold S. Kayden is the Frank Backus Williams Professor of Urban Planning and Design at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. His teaching and scholarship address issues of land use and environmental law, public and private real estate development, public space, and urban disasters and climate change. His books include Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience; Urban Disaster Resilience: New Dimensions from International Practice in the Built Environment; Landmark Justice: The Influence of William J. Brennan on America's Communities; and Zoning and the American Dream: Promises Still To Keep.

As urban planner and lawyer, Professor Kayden has advised governments, non-governmental organizations, and real estate developers in the United States and around the world. He has consulted for the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, the United States Agency for International Development, and the United Nations Development Programme, among others, working principally in Armenia, China, Nepal, Russia, and Ukraine. Since 1991, he has served as principal constitutional counsel to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Washington, D.C., and leads Advocates for Privately Owned Public Space, a non-profit organization based in New York City.

At the Design School, where he served as co-chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, he was recognized schoolwide as “Teacher of the Year.” He earned his undergraduate, law, and city and regional planning degrees from Harvard, and subsequently was law clerk to Judge James L. Oakes of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. of the U.S. Supreme Court. (Click Here for Full Bio)

  Robert Stowe  is Executive Director of the  Harvard Environmental Economics Program  (HEEP) and Co-Director of the  Harvard Project on Climate Agreements , both University-wide initiatives based in the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). He teaches courses on climate-change policy at HKS and, with the HEEP team, designs the curriculum for an HKS executive-education program on climate-change and energy policy.  Dr. Stowe has participated, through the Harvard Project, in the annual Conferences of the Parties of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change since 2007. He was a Contributing Author to a chapter on international cooperation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report and has participated regularly in biannual meetings of the Climate Change Expert Group, hosted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, in Paris.  With the HEEP and Harvard Project team, Dr. Stowe has designed agendas for fourteen research workshops and policy roundtables since 2011. Topics include China’s national carbon-pricing system, the elaboration and implementation of the Paris Agreement, sub-national climate-change policy in North America, and the governance of solar geoengineering. Workshops and roundtables have been held at HKS and in Beijing, Shanghai, Toronto, Mexico City, Berlin, and New York. Dr. Stowe has co-edited, with Professor Robert Stavins (HKS), three volumes of expert briefs based on research workshops (most recently:   International Cooperation in East Asia to Address Climate Change  , February 2018).  Dr. Stowe holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an A.B. in physics from Harvard College.

Robert Stowe is Executive Director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program (HEEP) and Co-Director of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, both University-wide initiatives based in the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS). He teaches courses on climate-change policy at HKS and, with the HEEP team, designs the curriculum for an HKS executive-education program on climate-change and energy policy.

Dr. Stowe has participated, through the Harvard Project, in the annual Conferences of the Parties of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change since 2007. He was a Contributing Author to a chapter on international cooperation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report and has participated regularly in biannual meetings of the Climate Change Expert Group, hosted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, in Paris.

With the HEEP and Harvard Project team, Dr. Stowe has designed agendas for fourteen research workshops and policy roundtables since 2011. Topics include China’s national carbon-pricing system, the elaboration and implementation of the Paris Agreement, sub-national climate-change policy in North America, and the governance of solar geoengineering. Workshops and roundtables have been held at HKS and in Beijing, Shanghai, Toronto, Mexico City, Berlin, and New York. Dr. Stowe has co-edited, with Professor Robert Stavins (HKS), three volumes of expert briefs based on research workshops (most recently: International Cooperation in East Asia to Address Climate Change, February 2018).

Dr. Stowe holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an A.B. in physics from Harvard College.

  John Macomber  is a Senior Lecturer in the Finance unit at Harvard Business School. His professional background includes leadership of real estate, construction, and information technology businesses. At HBS, Mr. Macomber's work focuses on the urban impacts of private finance and delivery of public infrastructure projects in both the developed and emerging worlds. These include transportation, energy, water/sanitation, and real estate investments that speed economic development, reduce environmental impacts (notably air and water pollution), and facilitate individual opportunity. His teaching combines infrastructure finance (including public-private partnerships), economic development, and urban planning as well as the impact of new technologies.   Mr. Macomber is engaged in the Business and Environment Initiative and Social Enterprise Initiatives at HBS and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Harvard University Center for African Studies. He teaches Finance, Real Estate, Urbanization, and Entrepreneurship courses in the elective curriculum and in Executive Education.   Mr. Macomber is the former Chairman and CEO of the George B H Macomber Company, a large regional general contractor; and remains a principal in several real estate partnerships. He serves or has served on the boards of Young Presidents Organization International (YPO), Boston Private Bank, Mount Auburn Hospital, and the WGBH Educational Foundation.

John Macomber is a Senior Lecturer in the Finance unit at Harvard Business School. His professional background includes leadership of real estate, construction, and information technology businesses. At HBS, Mr. Macomber's work focuses on the urban impacts of private finance and delivery of public infrastructure projects in both the developed and emerging worlds. These include transportation, energy, water/sanitation, and real estate investments that speed economic development, reduce environmental impacts (notably air and water pollution), and facilitate individual opportunity. His teaching combines infrastructure finance (including public-private partnerships), economic development, and urban planning as well as the impact of new technologies.

Mr. Macomber is engaged in the Business and Environment Initiative and Social Enterprise Initiatives at HBS and is a member of the Executive Committee of the Harvard University Center for African Studies. He teaches Finance, Real Estate, Urbanization, and Entrepreneurship courses in the elective curriculum and in Executive Education.

Mr. Macomber is the former Chairman and CEO of the George B H Macomber Company, a large regional general contractor; and remains a principal in several real estate partnerships. He serves or has served on the boards of Young Presidents Organization International (YPO), Boston Private Bank, Mount Auburn Hospital, and the WGBH Educational Foundation.

 
 

Who is Eligible to Apply?

In order to successfully apply to join this professional development program, you must meet the following criteria:

Current Master's or professional doctorate (e.g. JD, DrPH, MD) enrolled at Harvard University, on campus for the entire 2018-2019 Academic Year

Must be able to attend all mandatory sessions (listed below)

Must fully commit to be an active participant. This is a hands-on, student-driven program that requires participants to take the lead in developing and executing the program. 

Mandatory Events

Dinners are from 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Workshops are from 12:00pm - 4:00pm

Retreat: Sept 28th - Sept 30th, 2018
Dinner: Thursday, October 4th, 2018
Workshop: Saturday, October 13th, 2018
Dinner: Thursday, October 25th, 2018
Workshop: Saturday, November 3rd, 2018
Dinner: Thursday, November 15th, 2018
Dinner: Thursday, December 6th, 2018
Dinner: Thursday, January 31st, 2019
Workshop: Saturday, February 9th, 2019
Dinner: Thursday, February, 21st, 2019
Dinner: Thursday, March 7th, 2019
Workshop: Saturday, March 30th, 2019
Dinner: Thursday, April 11th, 2019
Final Event: Thursday, April 25th, 2019

Download Google Calendar with all events

Download iCal Calendar with all events

 

 

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Have Questions?

If you have any questions about the program, please feel free to contact Sanjay Seth (MPA/MUP '19) at sas6282@student.hks.harvard.edu.